Darryl Syms - M.A.T #AsatoSuhrContent Solo [TABS]

I never would’ve thought I’d win a contest like this - ever! But here’s my winning entry to the #AsatoSuhrContest, and the tabs for you to enjoy!

Download the Backing Track.

Download the GPX & PDF Tabs:
Darryl Syms - M.A.T Contest Solo - TABS.zip (150.3 KB)

Great solo and congrats on winning the contest! I was looking through the tab and noticed that there are some pretty complex rhythmic patterns (at least for me). I am curious if you are aware of these rhythmic patterns when you are playing (or composing).

I’ve been trying to be much more religious about my use of a metronome when practicing and learning new songs. Learning this solo by ear and playing along seems doable, but breaking it down rhythmically in order to play along with a metronome at a slower tempo is very daunting.

Thank you kind sir! Which patterns in particular are you referring to? Perhaps you could quote some timecodes from the video?

I’ve been trying to be much more religious about my use of a metronome when practicing and learning new songs.

I’ve never really used a metronome. I respect that it works well for some people, but for me I’ve always used my “internal metronome” to help with rhythm. Maybe the absence of a metronome is a good thing that has encouraged me to develop my timing internally. Maybe that’s something for you to think about and experiment with :raised_hands:

are aware of these rhythmic patterns when you are playing (or composing)

I don’t really focus on rhythm when composing, I just think about what sounds cool in my head. If a phrase sounds too uninteresting to me, then I might decide to change the rhythm of the notes in some instances. Perhaps also on a subconscious level I’m aware that, if for example I create a phrase that consists of 8th notes, then the next phrase should have a different rhythmic characteristic (otherwise all phrases will blend together as one endless string of notes).

Thanks for the explanation! It makes sense that you go by what sounds cool in your heard. A good example of the rhythmic patterns I am talking about is in bar 17.

At first I thought it was groups of 7 notes and groups a 9 notes per beat. However, now that I am reading it again, I’m not sure what the grouping is, maybe 7 notes per 32nd beat and 9 notes per double dotted 32nd notes.

To practice, I could slow it down in guitar pro to get a feel for the rhythm. But, if I didn’t have the tab and wanted to transcribe myself, I don’t think I would have ever figured out the rhythm with my current knowledge.

Ah! You’ve highlighted a very niche scenario there :wink: In this case, I couldn’t even figure out myself how I could most accurately annotate 39 notes in one bar, so the best I could figure was to group them into groups of 7 and 9.

In truth, this phrase began with the first 7 notes. I knew that I wanted a pause prior to this lick to break up the phrases, but I didn’t think about the exact timing, I just began when it felt right. I’d created that 7-note-lick, and then replicated that over multiple positions, until adding variety on the end. My motivation for the phrase was solely on how it sounds versus what the rhythm is.

In this particular example I actually just wanted to play as many notes as possible in a short space of time to demonstrate that I can play something fast, thus demonstrating a varied skillset in my music for the purpose of the contest :rofl: Concurrently, I think it’s important to include varied rhythm in music to break phrases up distinctly - otherwise if everything is played in 8th or 16th notes for example, it all sounds much the same in my opinion :man_shrugging:

To practice, I could slow it down in guitar pro to get a feel for the rhythm. But, if I didn’t have the tab and wanted to transcribe myself, I don’t think I would have ever figured out the rhythm with my current knowledge.

This is interesting. For me, I would slow down the music as much as necessary and listen for the first “chunk” of notes. Those first 7 notes indicate a chunk. After figuring out that chunk, I would move on to the next, and so forth until I struggle to remember any more. Then I would begin to focus on timing. Again, starting with the first chunk, and then adding the rest as building blocks. It helps to put that small section of the song on loop so you can play along over and over until you start hitting the mark :muscle:

I’m not sure if that’s helpful? In examples like these, I personally don’t think about the rhythm too much on a conscious level, but instead an internal subconscious level.

Thanks for the helpful explanation. It makes sense to not dive too deeply into the rhythm and instead rely more on the ear.

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